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Shipwrecks

The presence of the Cape Forchu Light Station did not always guarantee safe passage for mariners. As late as the 1950s, human error, storms, rough seas, and freak accidents caused many vessels to shipwreck along this rocky coastline.

• March 19, 1952 - The City of New York ran aground on Chebogue Ledge. No lives were lost. Originally named Samson, this vessel is widely suspected to be the 'mystery ship' that did not come to the aid of the Titanic.
• December 4, 1930 - The Linton ran aground on West Cape during a heavy snowstorm. The entire crew of eight was lost.
• 1918 - The passenger service steamship SS North Star ran aground on Green Island. No lives were lost.
• February 3, 1902 - The steamship Mira ran aground at Chebogue Point. All on board were saved.
• October 10, 1900 - The paddle steamer City of Monticello sank five miles west of Yarmouth Cape between Port Maitland and Sandford during a heavy gale. 36 lives were lost.


SS North Star Shipwreck

Shipwrecks

Watching the waves crash around Cape Forchu provides a small glimpse of the awesome and terrifying power of the sea. It continually shapes the lives of those who live and work by it. A source of beauty, bounty and economic prosperity, the sea can also be a dangerous and unpredictable force that causes unimaginable destruction and loss. The museum provides history, pictures, and other information on some of the many wrecks that occurred in the vicinity. The waters can be treacherous and in the days before modern navigational aids such as radar and GPS, shipwrecks were more common along these rocky coastlines. In 1874, Colonel Robert Morse recommended that a chain of lighthouses should be built along the shores of Nova Scotia from Cape Canso to Cape Sable.


Fisherman's Monument

Fisherman's Monument

A monument dedicated to all seamen who lost their lives at sea from Yarmouth County stands at John's Cove. It is also the site of the first ship launch in the county, which took place in 1764.